METRIC SYSTEM IN CANADA

METRIC SYSTEM IN CANADA

Canada adopted the metric system in the 1970s, but imperial measurements are often used as well. This can be confusing at first, but doesn't take very long to get used to.

Most things are measured in metric, and almost all official measurements are in metric units, including those on food and retail products. There are a few common exceptions. Canadians will usually talk about their own height in feet and inches, and their weight in pounds. Most cooking ranges will use Fahrenheit rather than Celsius, and people talk about their homes in terms of square feet rather than square metres. As well, older Canadians are sometimes more familiar with the imperial measurements, whereas younger Canadians are more familiar with metric.

Common metric measurements and their symbols
Weight: grams (g) and kilograms (kg) (1000 grams = 1 kilogram)
Length: centimetres (cm) and metres (m) (100 centimetres = 1 metre)
Distance: kilometres (km) (1000 metres = 1 kilometre)
Volume: millilitres (ml) and litres (l) (1000 millilitres = 1 litre)
Temperature: degrees Celsius (the freezing point of water is 0°C and the boiling point of water is 100°C)

Imperial / Metric conversion
Weight: 1 pound = 0.45 kilograms
Distance: 1 mile = 1.6 kilometres
Length: 1 inch = 2.54 centimetres; 1 foot = 30.48 centimetres
Volume: 1 gallon = 3.78 litres; 1 quart = 0.95 litres
Area: 1 acre = 0.4 hectares
Temperature: 32F = 0°C (the freezing point of water)